Virginia Haufler

Associate Professor and Director, Global Communities Living-Learning Program

Virginia Haufler is Associate Professor in the Department of Government and Politics at the University of Maryland, College Park and is affiliated with the Center for International Development and Conflict Management. Her research focuses on the changing nature of governance in the global political economy, especially the role of transnational corporations and corporate social responsibility. Her current research examines how transnational regulation of the private sector addresses issues of conflict and corruption.

She is also Director of the Global Communities Living-Learning Program, which introduces freshmen to scholarship and experiences that explore globalization, global issues and intercultural understanding. She has been a visiting scholar at University College London, University of California-Irvine, the University of Southern California, and the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. She has pressented her work at conferences, workshops and talks in more than a dozen countries. She has served on the boards of non-profit organizations, including Women in International Security, the Peace Research Institute Frankfurt, and the OEF Foundation, and has advised the Principles for Responsible Investment and the Business4Peace Platform of the UN Global Compact. She has a M.A./Ph.D from Cornell University and dual B.A. from Pennsylvania State University.

Recent Public Activities:

Roundtable: "Towards a Third Generation of Global Governance Scholarship" ISA 2018 San Francisco; summary at https://www.ucl.ac.uk/global-governance/ggi-comments-pub/isa-roundtable

Workshop: "Private Authority and Public Policy in Global Context: Competition, Collaboration or Coexistence" Copenhagen Business School March 2018

Public Lecture: "Producing Global Governance in the Global Factory" University College London March 2018

Areas of Interest:
  • International Political Economy
  • Global Governance
  • Corporate Social Responsibility
Degrees
  • PhD Cornell University Department of Government 1991
  • MA Cornell University Department of Government 1985
  • BA Pennsylvania State University Foreign Service and International Affairs 1979
  • BA Pennsylvania State University Russian Language and Literature 1979

At the undergradate level, I primarily teach: BSGC102 Globalization; BSGC102 Global Issus; GVPT289A Appetite for Change: The Politics of Global Food; and The Politics of Global Corporations. The BSGC courses are limited to students in the Global Communities Living-Learning program, which I direct. Global Food is an I-series course, and Global Corporations is an upper division course. I have supervised over a dozen undergraduate teaching assistants and a number of undergraduate research assistants. In addition, I have mentored students undertaking an Independent Major (IVSP); pursuing an Honors thesis in GVPT; participating in the McNair Scholars program; and freshmen in the SURE program.

At the graduate level, I regularly teach graduate seminars on International Political Economy, and International Political Organization/ Global Governance. In the past, I have co-taught the core International Relations seminar. I have mentored many students on their dissertation, both as chair and as committee member. Formerly, as Director of Graduate Placement, I taught a seminar/ workshop on Teaching in Political Science.

Course Name Course Title Semester Syllabus
GVPT289A Special Topics in Government and Politics; Appetite for Change: Politics and The Globalization of Food Spring 2015
GVPT761 International Political Economy Fall 2014 Syllabus
GVPT289A Special Topics in Government and Politics; Appetite for Change: Politics and The Globalization of Food Spring 2014 Syllabus

How does the world get governed, and what role does the private sector play in this? This is the central question of my research. My early projects focused primarily on the conditions under which the private sector establishes global standards, using the international risks insurance industry as a case study. Later work explored the arena of "corporate social responsibility" as a form of voluntary self-regulation by international business, comparing environment, labor, and information privacy standards. My current research looks at global governance more broadly, including the multi-stakeholder institutions that have become increasingly common. I am currently working on a project that examines the interaction between transantional activism and the creation of multi-stakeholder insitutions designed to regulate trade relations and corporate behavior as a mechanism to reduce civil conflict in resource-rich areas of the world (e.g., the Kimberley Process for the Certification of rough diamonds, the Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative, and others).

I am the Director of the Global Communities Living-Learning program. This is an invitation-only program for freshment undergraduates, who live together in Dorchester Hall, take classes together and participate in field trips and activities. The program encourages students to learn about globalization and global issues, and to develop intercultural communication skills. It combines the experience of living with students from a variety of diverse backgrounds, bringing together American and international students. The academic program consists of ten credits, including a three-credit "global experience" requirement (study abroad, service-learning, internship, etc). In addition, the program sponsors relevant events and field trips in the Washington, DC region.

I have served on numerous committees in the department, college and university. I am the advisor to the Model UN club and UNA-UMd club on campus.

Professionally, I regularly provide my expertise to review articles and books, and evaluate research project proposals. I have consulted for numerous non-profits, international organizations, and think tanks.

Campus Director, Global Communities Living-Learning Program
Former Students
  • Jennifer Wallace
  • Daniel Owens
  • Jacqueline Ignatova
  • Rabih Helou
  • Tara Innes
  • Michael McDonald
  • Mark Shirk
  • Ehsaneh Sadr
Related Students (Listed by Student on Student's Profile)
  • Prof. Virginia Haufler
3117J Chincoteague (GVPT) and 0116 Dorchester Hall (Global Communities)
Department of Government and Politics
Phone: (301) 405-4122
Email: vhaufler@umd.edu
Office Hours:
Fall 2018 Mondays and Wednesdays 3:30-5pm